Dr. Guion Bluford

Dr. Guion Bluford visited Penn State Harrisburg on Feb. 7, 2019, to discuss his experiences as an astronaut, space shuttle flights, and the future of manned space flight.

Image: Penn State Harrisburg

Heard on campus: Retired astronaut, Penn State alumnus Guion 'Guy' Bluford Jr.

HARRISBURG, Pa. — Retired astronaut and Penn State alumnus Guion “Guy” Bluford Jr. recently presented a talk titled “STEM Forward: Minorities in Engineering” at Penn State Harrisburg.

In his talk, Bluford discussed his space shuttle flights and the future of manned space flight. He also gave insight on his journey to obtaining a degree, and persevering and advancing in a science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) career.

Retired astronaut and Penn State alumnus Guion “Guy” Bluford Jr. recently presented a talk titled “STEM Forward: Minorities in Engineering” at Penn State Harrisburg, and offered a few words about his space shuttle flights and the future of manned space flight. He also gave insight on his journey to obtaining a degree, and persevering and advancing in a science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) career.

Penn State Harrisburg

 

In 1983, Bluford became the first African American to fly in space. He was also the first African American to return to space for a second, third and fourth time, and to be awarded NASA’s coveted Astronaut Pin and the United States Air Force’s Command Pilot Astronaut Wings. He was inducted into the International Space Hall of Fame in 1997 and the U.S. Astronaut Hall of Fame in 2010.

Bluford was born in Philadelphia and received a bachelor of science degree in aerospace engineering from Penn State in 1964, a master of science degree in aerospace engineering with distinction from the Air Force Institute of Technology in 1974, a doctor of philosophy degree in aerospace engineering with a minor in laser physics from the Air Force Institute of Technology in 1978, and a master of business administration degree from the University of Houston, Clear Lake in 1987.

The event was part of the TE Connectivity Lecture Series and was made possible by the School of Science, Engineering, and Technology, in partnership with the National Society of Black Engineers’ Penn State Harrisburg chapter.