Penn State Harrisburg

Donations in honor of former chancellor bolster Penn State Harrisburg scholarship fund

Dr. Madlyn L. Hanes

Dr. Madlyn L. Hanes

Private donations of more than $430,000 during a 30-day period this summer have enabled Penn State Harrisburg to bolster its Board of Advisers Endowed Scholarship Fund and to name its executive boardroom in honor of former chancellor, Madlyn L. Hanes. The boardroom, located in the college’s Olmsted Building, was dedicated August 18 as part of All-College Day activities.

“We deeply appreciate all of the generous contributions. They have enabled us to permanently seal Dr. Hanes’ outstanding legacy here by naming this newest executive conference room after her,” said Interim Chancellor Mukund Kulkarni. “Additionally, these donations will enhance our ability to provide financial assistance to outstanding Penn State Harrisburg students now and in the future.”

The donations have been designated for the Board of Advisers endowed fund, one of 55 scholarship funds at Penn State Harrisburg. The recent donations will permit the college to award an additional 20 scholarships to undergraduate students annually. In 2009-10, the college awarded more than $317,000 in scholarships from private donations and endowment-generated income.   
 
Lead donors in the effort included George and Judy Zoffinger; Russell Horn, Sr.; and GreenWorks Development, LLC, Harrisburg. Zoffinger, a 1970 Penn State Harrisburg graduate, is president of Constellation Capital Corporation, New Jersey. Horn is retired chairman and founder of Buchart Horn and Pace Resources, Inc., York. He graduated from Penn State in 1933. GreenWorks’ chief executive officer is Doug Neidich, a 1980 Penn State graduate; GreenWorks’ chief financial officer is John Tierney, a 1989 Penn State Harrisburg graduate.

“Nothing is more important than making sure that our young people have a full educational opportunity. Scholarships to those who need them ensures our economic future,” Zoffinger said.

“I have been a supporter of Penn State for a long time because the school gave me an opportunity to make a living,” Horn said. “For me to contribute toward scholarships and to recognize Dr. Hanes is appropriate. She helped the college grow in many ways, and I am proud to be part of it.”
 
“We recognize Penn State Harrisburg’s importance to the economic growth of the region and we are very pleased to acknowledge Dr. Hanes’ phenomenal work in advancing the college,” said Neidich.

Hanes served as Penn State Harrisburg chancellor from 2000-2010, before being named Penn State’s vice president for Commonwealth Campuses, effective July 1, 2010. She guided the college through a period of unparalleled growth. Under her leadership, the mission expanded to include freshmen and sophomores, creating a comprehensive undergraduate college and graduate school; enrollment increased to more than 4,000 students; the curriculum portfolio grew to 32 baccalaureate, 23 master's and three doctoral degrees; and state-of-the-art academic, student residence, and athletic facilities were added.

“Private philanthropy is critical to the college’s success,” Hanes said. “I am personally grateful for the many contributions that have led to the naming of the executive boardroom in my honor. I am humbled by the generosity of the donors and appreciative of their commitment to Penn State Harrisburg students, faculty, and staff.”